Happy Poetry Month, Gothic Novel Read, Poetry Collection by Jason Preu

two books by Jason Preu upon table, morningtime, captured within bright flashes of sun

After I’d completed reading a new poetry book from author Jason Preu, one I’d picked to read first, The Avocado Among Other Fruits and wrote down my immediate impressions, I realized then it is April 1st and so begins Poetry Month! Happy Poetry Month! Today is the final 13th day of my Spring Spa Day Celebration—Happy Spring!

Here is what I felt about Kansas City poet and writer, Jason Preu’s poetry book (2016), newfound to me author in the blog world (within our earth!):

The Avocado Among Other Fruits was selected by me to read first among Jason Preu’s books as I’d found the subject matter, “fruits” from the title, was something I’d like to read more about. I knew from the title, that there would be more in the book, beyond the subject, than simply a wicker basket of fruits for a decorative centerpiece though. And especially because “fruits” in the title was used as a plural, the way I’d pluralized the word myself on my blog memoir stories, I wanted to read this one.

The first few poems provide context, but the book really begins rolling with the poem that repeats the phrase “The dandelions…” in ways unexpected but gives more meaning and diversity to the poems before and after, “The dandelions” phrase repeated with different images to follow in each couplet, as the poetic technique known as “anaphora.”

Other poems that stood out to me were “The Banana,” “A Visit upon the Faerie Queen,” “Just Before The 10,000th Dawn,” “Incantation (Use With Caution),” and “Do My Results Align with Your Hypothesis?”

My book came with its own personal, very little Avocado bookmark with an excerpt of a poem by Preu on the back, and the smaller size of these paper books, shape of them, and the bookmark add a nice touch. A very pleasant physical book too, The Avocado Among Other Fruits reads like a kind of comedic comment on physicality in ruggedness and spontaneous contemplations on spirituality, considering what one does not know about fruits scientifically or knows, in ways that poems can have an almost polar opposite mood or meaning and still come together well.

Notable: What I know to be a William Carlos Williams allusion incredibly done well, and what I suspect to be a well done parody / spin by Preu, on Wallace Stevens’s (classically annoying) poem, “Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird.”

This book was nicely enjoyed as I’d read the poems through in a sequential fluidity, can reread a favorite or two again.

What’s beneath the cover title? I do know, it came as a surprise bonus, and it is hidden for suspense. 😊

~

Speaking of suspense, 600+ pgs in Ann Radcliffe’s The Mysteries of Udolpho had more an emotional effect than a speech from me—astonishing!

Concluding with a few lines about The Mysteries of Udolpho by Ann Radcliffe (1794):

This one lingers, completed tonight before sleep…** The comedy part moves into…I won’t say. Motif of darkness and lamplight played especially well, darkness as more of a veil than great danger, what a secret may do…acting on a misunderstanding (results?), and the nature of rumors without confrontation…lute music trailing thru ocean air, classic poems, and original sonnets and poems written by main character Emily sprinkled along, fairy fancy, closed rooms opened.


6 comments

  1. Thank you Sunra! It was a great read! And yes the cover appears like an illustrated mystery message that comes clearer through the poetry collection— but is not detachable to put onto your wall. 😂

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